Sarah Palin: Enough

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Filed Under Latest News on Jan 29 

Recently, former Governor Sarah Palin delivered a speech along with many other influential Republicans at the Iowa Freedom Summit. Many derogatory words can be used to describe her performance, I’ll just say it was cringe-making. For the sake of the GOP, it’s time to stop viewing Palin as some youthful (comparatively speaking) representative of the party but rather as an impediment to any attempt to expand the party outside of its base. I’m not sorry when I say that enough is enough, Palin is damaging to the Republican Party as a whole, especially at a time when the party is far from unified. It is time to stop providing her the attention she doesn’t deserve.

In 2008, then Governor Palin, was thrust onto the national stage by Senator John McCain by being chosen to be his running mate in the presidential campaign. I’m still boggled by the choice of Palin. Yes she brought youth and good looks to an otherwise and let’s be frank, old man campaign, yes she brought grass roots conservatism to an otherwise establishment campaign, and yes, the benefits of having a female running mate were real. Regardless, there were so many other choices available that could have provided the same. After McCain’s loss though she retained and in some ways gained support across the country .In my opinion though, her time in the light is over and she should just back off as she is now a danger to the party.

Truth be told, I’ve never been a firm believer in the idea of always voting along party lines, or showing absolute obedience to the party. The party is not infallible and I will never be that person who rushes to defend it due to some weird devotion and allegiance, when it is clearly wrong. I prefer individual candidates over the talking points of the national party. Not everyone is me though and unfortunately, rather than looking at individual candidates, many do and will use singular points to define a party; in this case, Palin will be used as she already is by some to generalize the Republican Party.

Now some might say I’m a bit too harsh on Palin and that my brand of Northeastern Republicanism is insignificant compared to the country Republicanism from which she derives her support. But can anyone say in all honesty that her recent “speech” at the Iowa Freedom Summit was anything more than a driveling, whiny, 35-minute embarrassment? Yes, people have bad days and not every speech will be a stunner though this isn’t isolated, rather a shining example of absurdity among a long line of absolute disasters. Between her gaffes on the campaign trail in 2008, to various statements made afterwards at conventions and as a talking head, to her channel (which I still don’t understand why it exists), we have now been blessed by this abomination.

This speech though came just as she was hinting that she might seek the GOP nomination for the 2016 presidential election. Many believe she is just blowing hot air, I think she might actually believe she has a chance. Whatever the case may be, this speech alone and the reaction to it can and should stand as reason enough for her to not even entertain the thought any more. Furthermore, Republicans should see this speech as indication that it is time to stop fueling the Palin cult of personality. I refuse to see otherwise excellent Republican candidates be criticized by those on the left who conjure up images of Palin and make electorally damaging connections between the two. By continuing to provide Palin with a seat at the table, the Republican brand is being damaged.

There are indications though that Palin may have crossed the line this time in the minds of some of her closest supporters. Several former supporters are now backtracking from her while others have become openly hostile and have ridiculed her. The speech which was half complaining and the other half a hodge-podge of criticisms against the left was simply that awful. Enough with the Mamma grizzly, folksy-speak, populist substituting for substantive rhetoric BS. The GOP should take warning. As long as Palin is put into positions where she is seen as a figurehead, role model, and spokesperson for the party, the GOP will actively hurt itself. This isn’t to say Palin should be silenced but rather sidelined to an extent. It’s been seven years since she was a vice-presidential candidate. Since then, apart from building her own base, she has raised money for some successful candidates and others who were total failures. Let Palin continue to do what she is doing in fundraising, just stop putting her in positions where she can be seen as a spokesperson for the party.

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