Left and Right—Again and Always

© 2020 Steve Feinstein. All rights reserved.

There are so many fundamental issues that serve as sharp lines of demarcation between left/Democratic thought and right/Republican thought. It’s been this way for years and those essential differences do indeed mark the boundary between liberal and conservative ideology:

  • Free-market capitalism vs. Government-controlled industries
  • Low taxation/personal freedom vs. confiscatory tax policy with high Government spending
  • Pro life vs. pro abortion
  • Strong military vs. anti-military
  • Desire to crack down on illegal immigration vs. open borders and unrestricted immigration
  • Merit-based admission and promotion vs. racial quotas and belief in social engineering
  • Goal of energy development/independence vs. stance that fossil fuels are inherently bad and harmful
  • Thought that climate variations are natural and not controllable by man vs. unwavering adherence to the doctrine of anthropogenic global warming

There are other issues that define the chasm between left and right as well. And in perfect candor, most average voters are some degree of purple between these red and blue extremes. It’s primarily the politicians and news media that are relatively monolithic in their philosophical beliefs. However, in an effort to whip up public sentiment and set the opposing side in as unflattering and negative a light as possible for purposes of partisan advantage, the left never fails to cast the important issues of the day as a choice between the correct/moral liberal side and the foolish/immoral conservative alternative.

So it is now, once again. The issue du jour is the re-opening of the economy after the country’s lockdown in response to the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic. We will leave aside for now the fact that the so-called pandemic never even came close to realizing the worst outcome in this country that many had predicted. The rate of infection and death rate have both been markedly lower than the early-on models predicted. In the country’s three hardest-hit areas—New York City, northern New Jersey and the Boston area—hospital capacity hasn’t even come close to being stretched to the breaking point. The US Navy ship Comfort just left NYC after barely being utilized at all and the field hospital set up in the Javits Center turned out to be totally unnecessary.

In Boston, the 1000-bed field hospital created at the Boston Convention Center was barely 20% utilized at its opening and the usage dropped to less than half of that shortly thereafter, as reported to me first-hand by the senior attending nurse.

The fact of the matter is that the coronavirus turned out to be a deadly disease that primarily affected the elderly (infection rates for those over 80 were many times higher than those even in their 60’s—see attached chart) and people with serious underlying conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity. The same can be said for any given year of the seasonal flu. And the country doesn’t shut down for the flu, nor is there any irrational, non-medically-legitimate frenzy over the wearing of facial coverings when driving alone in the car or walking outside in the breezy fresh air and sunshine.

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The virtually complete shutting down of our economy—questionable as it certainly looks in retrospect—has had its predictably calamitous effect on the economy and our daily social activity. Major industries have been decimated. Entertainment, cultural and sporting events have hit a brick wall. The population has had it now that they realize that so much of it was arbitrary and unwarranted. President Trump said he’ll leave the re-opening of the economy up to the governors of the respective states, as long as they do it with caution and common sense. And so, many states, in the face of declining new cases and the realization that their healthcare capacity is not threatened, have begun to relax their lockdowns and allow the re-emergence of private economic activity.

The subject of re-opening the states’ economies is now somehow deemed controversial, breaking down along party lines. Democrats and the liberal mainstream media criticize the re-openings, cautioning in a condescending manner that Republicans are more interested in re-opening the economy than they are concerned with the public good. High-profile public protests in Michigan and Massachusetts are being portrayed by the liberal media as coming from conservative hard-line Trump supporters, their actions characterized as out of step with the majority of the level-headed public. The battle lines are clearly drawn: Re-opening the economy is a Republican activity, reckless, dangerous, putting money ahead of humanity in classic uncaring conservative fashion. Remaining in lockdown until the landscape is totally safe, with no possible danger of a second wave, is the more compassionate, more sophisticated, more intellectual thing to do. Clearly, that’s the liberal position. (Interesting, isn’t it, that the original goal of the sequester was simply to “flatten the curve.” It was flattened weeks ago. Now the new goal—very conveniently unprovable—is to ensure that no new widespread re-infection resurfaces at any point in the future.)

A few years ago, liberal comedian Bill Maher said it would be worth it to have a recession in order to get rid of President Trump. Now, brought on by the global fear engendered by China unleashing the Wuhan virus on the world—whether intentionally or by their own incompetence—we have a recession. The afterburner-boosted economy, which had been President Trump’s crowning achievement amongst a veritable cornucopia of worthy accomplishments—has now come to a crashing halt, from a source no one could have foreseen, in a manner no one thought possible.

It’s no wonder the Democrats and liberal media see the re-opening of the economy as a bad thing: the Democrats’ electoral fortunes are directly inversely related to the direction of the economy as November draws near. If we’re still languishing in recession, with the airlines, cruise lines, concerts and baseball season still shuttered and people still dependent on Government handouts in order to pay their rent, the Democrats win.

If the economy has regained its footing, has arisen from the mat, beaten the count and is up and punching back, then President Trump’s future looks good.

There is an old French saying that goes, Qui bénéficie?  Roughly translated, it means, “Who benefits from this?” The answer is clear.