Byron York has a piece in the Washington Examiner that analyzes Senator Cruz and President Trump’s transactional relationship. It’s fascinating and not necessarily for the reasons one would suspect. Yes, they were rivals, more or less friendly ones at the start of the 2016 presidential campaign, which means in the fall of 2015. Then as they emerged as the two top contenders for the GOP nomination, things got nasty starting in Iowa and coming to a head as Trump became nominee in the spring of 2016. Cruz lashed out at Trump and basically called him a vile narcissist who treated people – including Cruz’s feisty Cuban-born father – terribly.

Trump won the election, and things changed. And now Senator Cruz is not just an ally but a close ally of the President.

What a load of hypocritical horsesh!t right?

Maybe not so load-of-sh!tty, as a matter of fact.

Why so? Because of you. The voters. That’s why.

America is a republic. A democratic republic, with elected representatives who serve their voters. It is not an administrative state, as much as many in the beltway wish that ALL of America was one sprawling set of all-seeing agencies, and they could therefore go about their plans for a perfect, government-run state that takes care of all your needs and tells you everything you must and mustn’t do.

The reality usually sits somewhere between majority voters deciding every issue and that dystopian vision of how America should be according to the bureaucrats.

Seen that way, it is interesting how leadership nowadays is seen as the ability to ignore the unwashed majority’s demands and do unpopular things for their own good. Yes, that may have very well have been what the founders envisioned especially with regards the Senate. But the problem is that the good that is sought today is not what the founders would have called the good. The good today is a statistic. A compilation of statistics.

The Good, Plato’s fundamental cornerstone of what guides a just society, has now devolved down to what we call Big Data. Google therefore knows the good. Not you. And Google has the goods. On you. And to run all that data that tells the experts what is good and what isn’t – the rather narrow range of values that the global elites have agreed on for a couple of generations now – you need lots of administrators, don’t you?

In fact, the agencies in Washington are currently in a panic because their IT professionals are close to my age, which is nowhere near young. The administrative state and Silicon Valley are the same parts of an enormous blob that functions much more like old-fashioned oligopolies than their lean, disruptive, and innovative image that they nourish so carefully with the complicity of big media, would like you to think. And they need young blood to staff the blob.

So, the administrative state and its branches in tech and the media work around, over, and under the transactional relationship you should have with your representative. It’s one of the things that Trump is taking a sledgehammer to, and big Tech is pissed off naturally.

That means that transactional is an adjective that not only applies to foreign policy, or the relationship between Trump and Cruz, but also to the relationship between voters and their representatives. Voters enter into a transaction with any given candidate based partly on the candidate’s views (or ideology if you must use that frickin’ word) and on how they’ve voted once in office. With all due respect (which is very little) to Karl Marx’s coined phrase.

What gets in the way of that transaction between voters and their representatives is the administrative state. Yes, the Constitution itself sets up checks and balances to guard against the tyranny of the majority, but the administrative state is so deeply embedded within the executive branch itself, that it has flown under the radar of those checks and balances and only recently has it truly begun to be brought out into the light and attacked as undemocratic. From Justice, to the intel agencies, to the IRS and the EPA: the agencies that have accumulated so much power are at last a little more visible as to their ever expanding reach and thus more subject to voter anger.

Maybe that’s why voters lined up overnight to see the Trump-Cruz rally. They’re getting transactional with their elected representatives. They might even call it a grand bargain.

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