The US Chamber of Commerce likes Washington so much that they spent over $35 million on federal elections in 2012 according to the Center for Responsive Politics. That’s hardly surprising seeing they represent companies in the world’s largest economy. No the Chamber of Commerce is not a government department, it’s a lobby group. How conservative the Chamber of Commerce actually is, is open to debate. They supported the Clinton’s failed health care reform and lost a few members as a result. Since the early 90’s they have apparently shifted back to the right, but last fall, Bloomberg News declared that a civil war had erupted between Tea Party stalwarts like Ted Cruz and the USCC over it’s opposition to government shutdowns as a negotiating tactic. They did not support Obamacare but now a key decision is coming if Obama uses an executive order to grant amnesty to illegal immigrants. USCC members like the National Restaurant Association are in favor of amnesty and business groups worked with the gang of eight in the Senate in its attempt at immigration reform.

Assuming Obama does issue that executive order – some are beginning to doubt it because blanket amnesty would anger some labor groups as well as African Americans – there could be a further split between Tea Party members and some conservatives and big business. There is a curious confluence between those on the left who argue that illegals help keep wages low because of their vulnerable status, and those on the right who say illegals take jobs away from those Americans as well as keep wages low. Their solutions are diametrically opposed; Amnesty or Deportation. Amnesty is uncomfortable at a certain level for big labor as well; they would love to increase latino participation in union membership and turn back a steadily declining trend, but also are aware that a large pool of illegals will inevitably keep wages under pressure for their members. Whether business has thought through the consequences of a large scale amnesty and how it likely would encourage further illegal immigration on an even larger scale is uncertain. A low wage economy is hardly the recipe for future prosperity. An economy where the rule of law is respected, and where labor markets have the freedom to be flexible within that very rule of law, is something else.

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