Recently a scandal has emerged in Germany concerning U.S. intelligence activities in that country. A senior CIA official at the U.S. embassy in Berlin has been expelled from the country in response to two instances of alleged spying by the U.S. This comes at a bad time for the U.S. whose intelligence agencies have already been implicated in a variety of otherwise questionable activities over the past few years between domestic spying and spying on allies. In light of all that has happened one would think that the U.S. would take more precaution to avoid situations such as this, especially at a time when U.S. world power is slipping. Regardless, what has transpired should have been prevented if this administration actually cared to learn from its mistakes.

Now let’s be honest for a minute. The issue of the U.S. spying on its allies isn’t anything new; this is what we do, this is what many others so though it doesn’t make it right. Nor does it improve the image of the U.S. at a time when the world is in flames, our power is diminishing, and when we need friends the most. Germany is unarguably the powerhouse of Europe and is a major world player economically. We have been strong allies for over a half century and though that relationship has had its ups and downs, it is a strong relationship and one we should be keen to maintain. Unfortunately we are doing the exact opposite.

The Germans view spying in a somewhat different light than Americans. Remember that up until a decade and half ago, Germany was a divided state. Those who lived in the DDR (East Germany) remember all too well the activities of the Stasi, the state security service of the DDR. A combination of secret police and an intelligence agency, the Stasi is regarded as one of the most effective organizations of its type in history. The Stasi was brutally efficient in spying on citizens, turning citizens into informants, turning families and friends against each other and rooting out opposition. In a state where one can never be too sure if the person they are talking to is friend or foe, naturally the idea of spying is one to be hated. Now the issue of friend spying on friends has returned.

This matter is made all the worse as German Chancellor Angela Merkel was born and raised in the DDR. The memories of spying are ingrained in her mind. In December 2013, revelations emerged in the German news magazine Der Spiegel that the NSA was listening in on her personal mobile phone. At the time Merkel was furious and rightfully so, even confronting President Obama and stating “This is like the Stasi.” Angered not only by the possibility that her phone may have been tapped for over 10 years and that the U.S. had an extensive electronic surveillance program in Berlin was that the U.S. couldn’t be trusted with information it gathered as evidenced by the massive leaks from Edward Snowden.

Now I understand the president doesn’t know everything that is going on and can’t sign off on every decision for our intelligence agencies. One would think though that after the revelations last year, the president would sign an executive order to our intelligence agencies to stop such activities in Germany. Unfortunately it seems that Obama has failed to and now we are where we are today. So much for Obamas promises that we wouldn’t spy on our allies overseas anymore. Though one could have foreseen a situation such as this occurring since Obama rejected a proposed “no-spy” agreement with Germany that Merkel was pushing for. Now we find that the NSA has been using two Germans, one in the German defense ministry and another in the BND (the German equivalent to our CIA) to gather documents of interest. In response Germany has demanded a CIA official at the embassy in Berlin to be expelled from the country immediately.

What has the U.S. gained from these spying programs? Reportedly one of the Germans was gathering documents concerning a German parliamentary group that has been established to research U.S. spy programs in Germany. Additionally the Germans have claimed that the information gathered for the NSA was of little value. If such allegations are true, then the U.S. has sacrificed much for very little. Already Germans are screaming for a harsh rebuke of the U.S. and polls recently conducted find that Germans overwhelmingly view the U.S. as untrustworthy. For the Germans, who needs enemies when you have the U.S. as a friend, a U.S. which mind you in a situation such as this is its own worst enemy.

The relationship with Germany is at an all-time low. Merkel who has in the past been able to balance support and criticism for the U.S. might not be able to do so much longer. These latest spying allegations have brought Germany to a tipping point and it’s not only the opposition screaming but a majority of the country. There is a distinct deficit of trust that is only worsening. We could have stopped our spying activities after last year’s revelations but we didn’t. Because the president has failed to take action and to restrain the NSA and work towards treating Germany as an actual friend and ally, we have repeated the same mistakes but now the repercussions are for worse.

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