Everytime I hear it, I cringe, the same way I cringe when I think of chewing aluminum foil: “The problem of income equality.” What on Earth does that mean?
There are rich people and there are poor people. A good Christian (or Jew or Muslim or Hindu) offers a portion of their money for charity, helping those in need. There’s nothing wrong with that. But the declaration of “income inequality” as a global problem makes me cringe. I have the image of bureaucratic fingers digging into our bank accounts, angry that we were able to manage and save our money well over the years.

As far as a global problem, I can understand that. You have countries with per capita income of less than $100 a year in Africa, and the despotic leaders lounging in gold bathtubs. That’s wrong, but that’s also a problem for the UN. My money has nothing to do with that scenario. But in the U.S.?

The phrase itself conjures differing mindsets of money. When I think of my savings account, 401k, 403b, pension fund and checking account, I consider the time and effort I put into building them up. Reading books on finance, advice from my father, even attending a workshop by Dave Ramsey…It’s not simply an account but a construction of patience and forward thinking. Those who believe that all people should have equal income see it as a fattened sow waiting to be butchered. THAT makes me nervous.

I don’t mind helping the poor. Really, I don’t. Show me commercials, solicit outside the grocery stores and Walgreens, that’s all fine. I’ve never been able to pass up a Humane Society stand without dropping in at least a $10.

Categorizing my financial stability as a problem tells me that if I happened to pass a Salvation Army stand and don’t drop in my change, they have every right to stop me, yank open my wallet and take the money. The oddest thing is that’s not an exaggeration. That’s exactly what liberals want as a solution for “income inequality.” If you don’t donate as much as we think you should, we’ll just take it.

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