Jeff Wright, the brother of intrepid PD Editor Jason Wright, sent this fun little note:

I wonder if you have a contact in Congress that might get the ball rolling on a new bill. The health and safety of the American people should be of utmost importance to the administration. I just conducted an informal poll and was quite disturbed to learn that there are a number of American households without a first aid kit. Considering that having one of these is an important contributor to health and safety, and also considering that the Supreme Court has now ruled that the administration can tell Americans what they need to buy, I propose a bill be drafted and submitted to Congress that requires all households to own a first aid kit.

Another little tidbit leading into the weekend involves the Obama Campaign’s latest fundraising strategy:

Is your wedding, birthday, or anniversary coming up? President Barack Obama has the perfect gift registry for you. Skip Bed Bath & Beyond, he suggests, and have your guests donate straight to his re-election campaign. To make this process easier, the Obama reelection campaign has started an event registry to let supporters request donations from their family and friends instead of gifts on their big day. They make setting up and sharing your registry with everyone you know as easy as can be.

Who needs a food processor or toaster oven? A donation to the Campaign to Re-elect Barack Obama is certainly the gift that keeps on giving!

Comments

  • Anonymous

    Weird to see Brian, great supporter of tyranny, invoking the great name of liberty.

  • Anonymous

    Weird to see Brian, great supporter of tyranny, invoking the great name of liberty.

  • Anonymous

    Good morning. In less than a year, people from here will join others from around the country. And you will be launching the largest philosophical battle in the history of mankind. “Mankind.” That word should have new meaning for all of us today. We can’t be consumed by our petty differences anymore. We will be united in our common interests. Perhaps it’s fate that today is the Fourth of July, and you will once again be fighting for our freedom… From tyranny, oppression, persecution… from Liberalism. We are fighting for our right to live. To exist. And should we win the day, the 28th of June can once again be known as just another day, instead of Dependence Day.   This November, make sure that this country declares in one voice: “We will not go quietly into the night!” We will not vanish without a fight! We’re going to live on! We’re going to survive! Today we revive the Constitution!

    • Anonymous

      Nice play on a most appropriate speech from a fictional POTUS who is by far greater than the real one we have. It is true, indeed. No more back and forth about the arguments of the past and who is worthy of our support. This election is between Liberty or Tyranny. There is no “Republican light” or “lesser of two evils” in this race any longer. Anyone who has ever doubted the true differences of the left and right will find out come January 2013, when we are either turning the page on utter joke that has been the last four years or we are looking at four more years of a consolidation of power Nd N extension of the state that will bring America down to its knees, thus rendering her equal to the failed nations of our European allies.

      • German Observer

        “This election is between Liberty or Tyranny.” ???

        Brian, please …

        • Anonymous

          Americans view tyranny very differently than Europeans, GO. Europeans are more accepting to the mandates, dictates, debt and regulations of government than us backwoods Americans.  Many of us, although I wish it were more of us, view a government that has veto power over our health care decisions to be a tyranny. Most Europeans do not. 

          On a side note, GO. I have been wanting to get your perspective.

          Is Germany willing to pay large amounts of money to bail out Greece? Greece is a nation where its people retire in their early 50s and Germans retire in their late 60s, yet, Germans are willing to pay another nations citizens so GREEKS can retire two decades sooner? Greeks can no longer live cradle to grave off their own government so now their going to live cradle to grave off yours? Sounds absurd from my perspective.

          • German Observer

            Brian, agreed that Americans and Europeans generally have different attitudes towards laws and regulations. But as a teacher you certainly are not only know how to use the grammar correctly but also properly assess the meanings of words. Hence you are pretty aware that tyranny has a connotation, which is not really appropriate here, but is rather demagogous.

            Regarding Greece: Agreed, this whole story is absurd. It is a very well idea, misconstructed in so many ways decades ago by the leaders of the time then (among them Germnays old chancellor Helmut Kohl, who not only in this case proved to be an nut-head). And, no, nobody here really likes to pay the rents for Greeks, who for decades did not pay taxes, were corrupt and too dumb to build up a working administration. People are highly emotionalized. On the other hand, most people understand, that bailing out the Greeks is a simple matter of neccassity (spelled correctly, Mr. teacher?), to save the Euro – and thus say “hopefully its just the Greeks and the Porrtuguese, the Spanish, the Italians, the Irish etc. don’t queue up as well …

            • Anonymous

              “neccassity”??? Not sure where I wrote that. No doubt I write long wordy rants and am a two finger typist and spelling errors happen quite often. Blogs are written and often typed as conversations and not a college thesis where editing is a priority. To poke at my profession as a teacher for spelling and grammatical errors on a blog is kind of silly.  My peers have voted me Teacher of the Year, I have the single highest test scores in my grade/subject area of any non-applicant schools in the city of Houston, I have over two hundred followers on a Facebook page in my honor that I did not even create, a student did, years ago, and she continues to maintain it.

              Back to the subject.
              So the problem in Greece is that they did not pay enough taxes? It has nothing to do with cradle to grave entitlements? In 2009, according to my deep research (Wikipedia) the tax rates in Greece were 0%, 25%, 35% and 40%.  Fairly close to our own in the USofA. Perhaps the problem in Greece is not tax rates are too small, but, taxpayers are too few. When you live in a society that allows you to retire in full in your early 50s and live off the public treasury for 30 years, of course you will have a revenue shortage. When you live in a society where government entitlements provides you with a sustainable standard of living without having to work it is no surprise that a shortage of revenue would become problematic. The good news, of course, is that the Greeks have the compassion of their fellow European nations to bail them out…until Spain and Portugal fall next.

              What liberals and big tax advocates fail to comprehend is that higher tax rates do not necessarily translate to higher revenues. More often the case in a society where regulations are not staggering, lower tax rates results in economic growth, lower unemployment, more innovation, more risk, more tax payers, and as a result more revenues. Liberals correlate tax rates with tax revenues. One of the many flaws in logic, or lack of, that is widespread among leftist thinkers.

              • German Observer

                Brian, first, with the neccassity-thing I was just teasing you. Took off the ball from Gary about your mis-spelling and threw it a second time. If you re-read the sentence where I used it, you’ll notice that I did not quote you, but used it myself – simply being too lazy to look it up in my dictionary and taking the opportunity to poke some fun at you. No great shakes and hat tip for your accomplishments as a teacher.

                Whatever bad one might say about Greece is true unfortunatly, and so is yours. Of course a retirement age of 50 is a problem. Another one is that 40% or so don’t “work” in the private sector but for the state’s administration on which state-level ever. But what I say is true as well. Greece is very well known for not having a well-run administration / bureaucracy – which is quite ironic regarding the number of people employed in pubklic service. At the end of the day they don’t have a system of working fiscal authorities, who ACTUALLY collect the tax-rates, that you quote. Nobody really pays the taxes, which they officially are obliged to. There are numerous millionaires and billionaires (and there are plenty of them), who pay 1000 Euros or so per year, because nobody conrolls it. To make it short: the basis of a state always is institutions that you can trust in – and Greece completly lacks thereof.

                Finally, Brian, its too late actually to discuss your last point and I have to go to bed. Just let me say, that you are just simplifying the thing too much. Yes, higher tax rates correlate with higher tax revenues – to a certain extend and if not set too high. On the other hand, its wrong and there is no real empirical evidence, that lower tax rates correlate sustainably to higher tax revenues or higher prosperity – at least it’s much to simple to suggest so as a general rule. Take Greece as an example. As I said the tax rate for the wealthy and also for companies is de facto pretty close to zero. But this did not lead to any significant entrepeneural activities, employment, innovation etc.

              • Anonymous

                Many great points and I appreciate your knowledge on the subject because I admittedly know little. Make no mistake about it I can easily see the bureaucracy of Greece being unable to work effectively and not very well run if what you say is true. The mere size of their bureaucracy, 40% of their work force is why their administrations and government agencies work so poorly. They are inflated and over blown. We have the same issues with our bureaucracies in America, which is why some of us prefer the more efficient private sector when it comes to the quality of providing goods and services. Sure. Government agencies are needed for certain public works, without a doubt. But, when agencies become over inflated there becomes little to no incentive for those within the systems to work harder or smarter. They have no risk of competition to replace them if they provide a bad service. I see the same thing in public education in the states.

                Just last week I went into my local government drivers license agency to ask a very simple question. The room was crowded and hot, the walls and floors dirty, old desks and musky smell. I waited patiently, something I am not very good at, and a very simple question to a government employee wearing a badge. Mrs? I asked, can I replace a lost drivers license online or do I need to wait in this long line? She never acknowledged my question but grabbed a paper and handed it to me. Again I asked, can I replace it online? She rudely said I don’t know go look it up. I informed her she was the person behind the “Information” desk and I am requesting fairly simple information. Needless to say I grabbed my iPad after exchanging some words and I looked the information up myself. I went back to her after 2 minutes and showed her the answer for which she did not have a clue or even wanted to have a clue. I informed her of her blessing of having a government job where not knowing or seeking out simple information for the customer is not a requirement because she has no competition. Not all, but far too many people who could never make it in the private sector find themselves in cushion government bureaucracies. I assume the same is true in Greece and everywhere else.

              • Anonymous

                You are wrong about the tax rates. There is plenty of evidence that demonstrates lowering tax rates increases revenue. In the 1960’s, 1980’s, and 2003 rates were lowered and the years that followed saw an increase in government revenues. Unfortunately, too often the increase in revenues is drowned out by a massive increase in spending. But, it is not about growing tax rates, it is about growing the economy that in return leads to more people working and more people paying into the system.

              • Gururussell

                Hey, GO, I’m being falsely accused here!
                Perhaps you are referrring to dw’s correction of Brian’s grammar?

              • Gururussell

                Although I have been known to take Brian to task for his phobia of cliches and his overuse of the word “laughable”.

              • Anonymous

                That made me very laughable.

  • Anonymous

    Good morning. In less than a year, people from here will join others from around the country. And you will be launching the largest philosophical battle in the history of mankind. “Mankind.” That word should have new meaning for all of us today. We can’t be consumed by our petty differences anymore. We will be united in our common interests. Perhaps it’s fate that today is the Fourth of July, and you will once again be fighting for our freedom… From tyranny, oppression, persecution… from Liberalism. We are fighting for our right to live. To exist. And should we win the day, the 28th of June can once again be known as just another day, instead of Dependence Day.   This November, make sure that this country declares in one voice: “We will not go quietly into the night!” We will not vanish without a fight! We’re going to live on! We’re going to survive! Today we revive the Constitution!

    • Anonymous

      Nice play on a most appropriate speech from a fictional POTUS who is by far greater than the real one we have. It is true, indeed. No more back and forth about the arguments of the past and who is worthy of our support. This election is between Liberty or Tyranny. There is no “Republican light” or “lesser of two evils” in this race any longer. Anyone who has ever doubted the true differences of the left and right will find out come January 2013, when we are either turning the page on utter joke that has been the last four years or we are looking at four more years of a consolidation of power Nd N extension of the state that will bring America down to its knees, thus rendering her equal to the failed nations of our European allies.

      • German Observer

        “This election is between Liberty or Tyranny.” ???

        Brian, please …

        • Anonymous

          Americans view tyranny very differently than Europeans, GO. Europeans are more accepting to the mandates, dictates, debt and regulations of government than us backwoods Americans.  Many of us, although I wish it were more of us, view a government that has veto power over our health care decisions to be a tyranny. Most Europeans do not. 

          On a side note, GO. I have been wanting to get your perspective.

          Is Germany willing to pay large amounts of money to bail out Greece? Greece is a nation where its people retire in their early 50s and Germans retire in their late 60s, yet, Germans are willing to pay another nations citizens so GREEKS can retire two decades sooner? Greeks can no longer live cradle to grave off their own government so now their going to live cradle to grave off yours? Sounds absurd from my perspective.

          • German Observer

            Brian, agreed that Americans and Europeans generally have different attitudes towards laws and regulations. But as a teacher you certainly are not only know how to use the grammar correctly but also properly assess the meanings of words. Hence you are pretty aware that tyranny has a connotation, which is not really appropriate here, but is rather demagogous.

            Regarding Greece: Agreed, this whole story is absurd. It is a very well idea, misconstructed in so many ways decades ago by the leaders of the time then (among them Germnays old chancellor Helmut Kohl, who not only in this case proved to be an nut-head). And, no, nobody here really likes to pay the rents for Greeks, who for decades did not pay taxes, were corrupt and too dumb to build up a working administration. People are highly emotionalized. On the other hand, most people understand, that bailing out the Greeks is a simple matter of neccassity (spelled correctly, Mr. teacher?), to save the Euro – and thus say “hopefully its just the Greeks and the Porrtuguese, the Spanish, the Italians, the Irish etc. don’t queue up as well …

            • Anonymous

              “neccassity”??? Not sure where I wrote that. No doubt I write long wordy rants and am a two finger typist and spelling errors happen quite often. Blogs are written and often typed as conversations and not a college thesis where editing is a priority. To poke at my profession as a teacher for spelling and grammatical errors on a blog is kind of silly.  My peers have voted me Teacher of the Year, I have the single highest test scores in my grade/subject area of any non-applicant schools in the city of Houston, I have over two hundred followers on a Facebook page in my honor that I did not even create, a student did, years ago, and she continues to maintain it.

              Back to the subject.
              So the problem in Greece is that they did not pay enough taxes? It has nothing to do with cradle to grave entitlements? In 2009, according to my deep research (Wikipedia) the tax rates in Greece were 0%, 25%, 35% and 40%.  Fairly close to our own in the USofA. Perhaps the problem in Greece is not tax rates are too small, but, taxpayers are too few. When you live in a society that allows you to retire in full in your early 50s and live off the public treasury for 30 years, of course you will have a revenue shortage. When you live in a society where government entitlements provides you with a sustainable standard of living without having to work it is no surprise that a shortage of revenue would become problematic. The good news, of course, is that the Greeks have the compassion of their fellow European nations to bail them out…until Spain and Portugal fall next.

              What liberals and big tax advocates fail to comprehend is that higher tax rates do not necessarily translate to higher revenues. More often the case in a society where regulations are not staggering, lower tax rates results in economic growth, lower unemployment, more innovation, more risk, more tax payers, and as a result more revenues. Liberals correlate tax rates with tax revenues. One of the many flaws in logic, or lack of, that is widespread among leftist thinkers.

              • German Observer

                Brian, first, with the neccassity-thing I was just teasing you. Took off the ball from Gary about your mis-spelling and threw it a second time. If you re-read the sentence where I used it, you’ll notice that I did not quote you, but used it myself – simply being too lazy to look it up in my dictionary and taking the opportunity to poke some fun at you. No great shakes and hat tip for your accomplishments as a teacher.

                Whatever bad one might say about Greece is true unfortunatly, and so is yours. Of course a retirement age of 50 is a problem. Another one is that 40% or so don’t “work” in the private sector but for the state’s administration on which state-level ever. But what I say is true as well. Greece is very well known for not having a well-run administration / bureaucracy – which is quite ironic regarding the number of people employed in pubklic service. At the end of the day they don’t have a system of working fiscal authorities, who ACTUALLY collect the tax-rates, that you quote. Nobody really pays the taxes, which they officially are obliged to. There are numerous millionaires and billionaires (and there are plenty of them), who pay 1000 Euros or so per year, because nobody conrolls it. To make it short: the basis of a state always is institutions that you can trust in – and Greece completly lacks thereof.

                Finally, Brian, its too late actually to discuss your last point and I have to go to bed. Just let me say, that you are just simplifying the thing too much. Yes, higher tax rates correlate with higher tax revenues – to a certain extend and if not set too high. On the other hand, its wrong and there is no real empirical evidence, that lower tax rates correlate sustainably to higher tax revenues or higher prosperity – at least it’s much to simple to suggest so as a general rule. Take Greece as an example. As I said the tax rate for the wealthy and also for companies is de facto pretty close to zero. But this did not lead to any significant entrepeneural activities, employment, innovation etc.

              • Anonymous

                Many great points and I appreciate your knowledge on the subject because I admittedly know little. Make no mistake about it I can easily see the bureaucracy of Greece being unable to work effectively and not very well run if what you say is true. The mere size of their bureaucracy, 40% of their work force is why their administrations and government agencies work so poorly. They are inflated and over blown. We have the same issues with our bureaucracies in America, which is why some of us prefer the more efficient private sector when it comes to the quality of providing goods and services. Sure. Government agencies are needed for certain public works, without a doubt. But, when agencies become over inflated there becomes little to no incentive for those within the systems to work harder or smarter. They have no risk of competition to replace them if they provide a bad service. I see the same thing in public education in the states.

                Just last week I went into my local government drivers license agency to ask a very simple question. The room was crowded and hot, the walls and floors dirty, old desks and musky smell. I waited patiently, something I am not very good at, and a very simple question to a government employee wearing a badge. Mrs? I asked, can I replace a lost drivers license online or do I need to wait in this long line? She never acknowledged my question but grabbed a paper and handed it to me. Again I asked, can I replace it online? She rudely said I don’t know go look it up. I informed her she was the person behind the “Information” desk and I am requesting fairly simple information. Needless to say I grabbed my iPad after exchanging some words and I looked the information up myself. I went back to her after 2 minutes and showed her the answer for which she did not have a clue or even wanted to have a clue. I informed her of her blessing of having a government job where not knowing or seeking out simple information for the customer is not a requirement because she has no competition. Not all, but far too many people who could never make it in the private sector find themselves in cushion government bureaucracies. I assume the same is true in Greece and everywhere else.

              • Anonymous

                You are wrong about the tax rates. There is plenty of evidence that demonstrates lowering tax rates increases revenue. In the 1960’s, 1980’s, and 2003 rates were lowered and the years that followed saw an increase in government revenues. Unfortunately, too often the increase in revenues is drowned out by a massive increase in spending. But, it is not about growing tax rates, it is about growing the economy that in return leads to more people working and more people paying into the system.

              • Gururussell

                Hey, GO, I’m being falsely accused here!
                Perhaps you are referrring to dw’s correction of Brian’s grammar?

              • Gururussell

                Although I have been known to take Brian to task for his phobia of cliches and his overuse of the word “laughable”.

              • Anonymous

                That made me very laughable.

  • Steve M.

    How is a tax on not having something fundamentally different than tax break for having something?
    What is the difference between the child tax credit or the mortgage interest tax credit and this tax? I am being effectively taxed for not having a mortgage and for not having a child. The only difference is the break is on income tax as opposed to some other tax.
    We’ve created a universal “Health Care Tax” assessed on every American. You get a tax break equal to the size of the tax if you have Health Insurance.

    • Anonymous

      The problem is that this President was dishonest and campaigned that it was not a tax and after it was passed on such deception he immediately began arguing before the court that it was a tax for which was under federal authority. If he, like you, realized it was in fact a tax he should have argued its worthiness for what it in fact was.

      • dw

        Don’t be so hard on the POTUS. He had to read the bill to find out what was in it, and he did not do that until it was challenged in court.
        /sarcasm

        • Anonymous

          I like your theory accept for the fact that I remain quite convinced he has yet to read it. My guess is John Roberts has read more of the bill than Obama.

          • dw

            OK, I don’t usually critique posts for grammar, but I found it humorous that a teacher incorrectly used “accept” instead of “except”. ;-)

            • Anonymous

              Good call on the grammar correction.

    • Gururussell

      Just for starters…
      One big glaring difference is that the Child Tax Credit will not cause the child bearing industry to go out of business, or be assimilated into a government child bearing program.

  • Steve M.

    How is a tax on not having something fundamentally different than tax break for having something?
    What is the difference between the child tax credit or the mortgage interest tax credit and this tax? I am being effectively taxed for not having a mortgage and for not having a child. The only difference is the break is on income tax as opposed to some other tax.
    We’ve created a universal “Health Care Tax” assessed on every American. You get a tax break equal to the size of the tax if you have Health Insurance.

    • Anonymous

      The problem is that this President was dishonest and campaigned that it was not a tax and after it was passed on such deception he immediately began arguing before the court that it was a tax for which was under federal authority. If he, like you, realized it was in fact a tax he should have argued its worthiness for what it in fact was.

      • dw

        Don’t be so hard on the POTUS. He had to read the bill to find out what was in it, and he did not do that until it was challenged in court.
        /sarcasm

        • Anonymous

          I like your theory accept for the fact that I remain quite convinced he has yet to read it. My guess is John Roberts has read more of the bill than Obama.

          • dw

            OK, I don’t usually critique posts for grammar, but I found it humorous that a teacher incorrectly used “accept” instead of “except”. ;-)

            • Anonymous

              Good call on the grammar correction.

    • Gururussell

      Just for starters…
      One big glaring difference is that the Child Tax Credit will not cause the child bearing industry to go out of business, or be assimilated into a government child bearing program.