Rick Santorum is suspending his campaign. From The New York Times: “Rick Santorum is suspending his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination on Tuesday, according two of his advisers, bowing to the inevitability of Mitt Romney’s nomination and ending his improbable, come-from-behind quest to become the party’s conservative standard-bearer in the fall.”

And their evil money dog bone:

But ultimately, Mr. Santorum’s campaign struggled under a nearly-constant barrage of negative ads paid for by Mr. Romney and the “super PAC” supporting him, Restore our Future, which has spent millions in an effort to ensure that Mr. Romney captures the nomination in his second attempt.

And so, the ABR (anybody but Romney) crowd is finally turned away disappointed and the political couch potatoes must turn their attention to Romney’s VP selection. Is there a VP out there that can turn tea leaves gold?

Comments

  • Anonymous
  • Anonymous
  • Whodat

    Oh, ye of little faith… do not despair!

    Romney is more conservative than Obama.

    Romney is only slightly less conservative than Santorum.

    Romney will have to stay to the right because he wants us conservatives to go vote.
    Romney will have a Congress more conservative than he to deal with and that will keep him to the right.

    So, we ABRs have tested Romney’s metal and he has endured our wrath and more.  Let us Hail the Victor and get behind him for the most important battle, against the dark side, the socialist ghetto lawyer and his band of America haters.  There is no value and no future in debating the past or who is now our standard bearer.  I think most of us understand what Job #1 is and what has to be done.  A few parochial pouters will sit out, but not me and not most.  We have a job to do and we need to get to it.

    • Anonymous

      How lovely it is to be on the same team once again, sir. 

      You are right in your analysis as well. Romney has campaigned as a conservative (whether people believe him or not) and will govern as such, no doubt. I could really care less what if he is or is not a “conservative” at heart. My goal is to get a candidate that can win and will govern as a conservative in actions. Romney has committed himself to the conservative cause and as such he is a smart and pragmatic man who will demonstrate his conservative bonafides up against Obama any day of the week.

    • Anonymous

      As was said in 2008: “Fired up and ready to go!”

      It’s all hands on deck, boys, now that the field is set. With the correct VP pick, Romney could harness some serious momentum. I personally like Ryan, McDonnell, and a few others. But Mittens needs to make a good pick. A bad one, and the lack of mojo lingers; a good one, and he could excite a large enough majority to take the game to Boy Blunder.

      • Whodat

         I have confidence that Romney will choose well.  This is a business decision as much as a political decision.  He will crunch the numbers as business guys do and as McRino did not.  I would be for Ryan above all, but he might be too toxic and a lightening rod for trouble.  Certainly, Romney is too cautious for a Palin surprise.  Rubio to me is still too young and untested, but certainly in play.

  • Whodat

    Oh, ye of little faith… do not despair!

    Romney is more conservative than Obama.

    Romney is only slightly less conservative than Santorum.

    Romney will have to stay to the right because he wants us conservatives to go vote.
    Romney will have a Congress more conservative than he to deal with and that will keep him to the right.

    So, we ABRs have tested Romney’s metal and he has endured our wrath and more.  Let us Hail the Victor and get behind him for the most important battle, against the dark side, the socialist ghetto lawyer and his band of America haters.  There is no value and no future in debating the past or who is now our standard bearer.  I think most of us understand what Job #1 is and what has to be done.  A few parochial pouters will sit out, but not me and not most.  We have a job to do and we need to get to it.

    • Anonymous

      How lovely it is to be on the same team once again, sir. 

      You are right in your analysis as well. Romney has campaigned as a conservative (whether people believe him or not) and will govern as such, no doubt. I could really care less what if he is or is not a “conservative” at heart. My goal is to get a candidate that can win and will govern as a conservative in actions. Romney has committed himself to the conservative cause and as such he is a smart and pragmatic man who will demonstrate his conservative bonafides up against Obama any day of the week.

    • Anonymous

      As was said in 2008: “Fired up and ready to go!”

      It’s all hands on deck, boys, now that the field is set. With the correct VP pick, Romney could harness some serious momentum. I personally like Ryan, McDonnell, and a few others. But Mittens needs to make a good pick. A bad one, and the lack of mojo lingers; a good one, and he could excite a large enough majority to take the game to Boy Blunder.

      • Whodat

         I have confidence that Romney will choose well.  This is a business decision as much as a political decision.  He will crunch the numbers as business guys do and as McRino did not.  I would be for Ryan above all, but he might be too toxic and a lightening rod for trouble.  Certainly, Romney is too cautious for a Palin surprise.  Rubio to me is still too young and untested, but certainly in play.

  • dw

    My only reason for wanting Santorum to stay in was to get to a convention and get someone better than either of these two as the nominee. Now, I guess we get 4 more years of Obama… sigh… Well, I sure hope the congress stays mixed so we can keep the gricklock in place.

    • Anonymous

      What did you think would happen at the convention? The superdelegates were never going to allow a convention train wreck.

  • dw

    My only reason for wanting Santorum to stay in was to get to a convention and get someone better than either of these two as the nominee. Now, I guess we get 4 more years of Obama… sigh… Well, I sure hope the congress stays mixed so we can keep the gricklock in place.

    • Anonymous

      What did you think would happen at the convention? The superdelegates were never going to allow a convention train wreck.

  • Jason Wright, Editor

    I can’t help but think, does this mean Romney turned out to be “viable” after all? 

    • Raúl Ramírez

      No. He will lose to Obama in a landslide.

    • Gururussell

      Viable?
      Yes.

      Desirable to conservatives?
      No.

      What is that “shaking” noise I’m hearing?

      • Jason Wright, Editor

        “Desirable to conservatives? No.” Pretty broad, don’t you think? Romney won this group in Wisconsin and has been steadily improving. I know a lot of conservatives who have been backing him since day one. 

        • Anonymous

          I have been backing him since day 2. Does that count?

          Wait! I forgot. I am not a “real conservative”.

          • David Kaiser, Editor

            Brian is just harboring a secret hope that Mittens will pick Tim Pawlenty as his running mate to fulfill his political fantasies…

            • Anonymous

              HaHaHa….

              As much as I like T-Paw he would not be my my #2 of choice. Ryan, Jindal, Rubio, etc. etc.

              I do believe the #2 field is quite deep and exciting.

        • Gururussell

          Pretty broad?
          Where??!!
          Just kidding…I’m a married man.

          Don’t know that his steady improvement among conservatives means anything much, other than the slow acceptance of the reality that “it is what it is” this year.

          But, I agree with Whodat…time to join up and fight the real enemy.
          However, we don’t need to pretend that conservatives are suddenly feeling a thrill up the leg.  We’re just gonna have to fake it.

          • Jason Wright, Editor

            Don’t think it means anything much? Hmmm. The alternative could have been that they went for Rick, or stayed home completely. There is at least one PD regular who’s said over and over he would not vote under any circumstances for Romney if he’s the nominee. I think what we’ve seen in recent weeks is that the literal ABR pool, i.e. people who won’t show up in November, is much smaller than advertised.

            But yes, I completely agree that this hardly means he’s bridged the enthusiasm gap. Don’t think he ever will or ever could. But can he win the middle? The group that decides most races?

            • dw

              Sure, Romney can win the middle. He’s Democrat-Lite, which will appeal to moderates. He may even draw in some Democrats, if Obama shifts hard left again.

              And, I’m not talking about social issues. I’m referring to the economy and role of the US government. It was very disappointing to see what Bush did in his last four years. Yes, Obama was even worse. But, I fear that Romney will be more of a spender than Bush, and really won’t fix the problems facing the US economy. What’s the point in that? Let Obama win the White House, but keep him in check with the Congress. Then, let’s get a real fiscal conservative and small government candidate in 2016 who is willing to make the cuts needed and return power to the states.

              I still find it hard to believe that the Libertarian party just can’t get any traction. They have a liberal social stand that should appeal to moderates, and a strong conservative fiscal approach that would appeal to a lot of the GOP. And, the foreign policy approach that would make Democrats smile. Speaking as a very social conservative person, I would (and have) vote Libertarian over GOP without hesitation, if the GOP candidates continue to look like Romney. 

              • Anonymous

                The Libertarian Party will always be a fringer third party because they take positions that both those on the left and right love, but, also positions that both on the left and right cringe in fear of.

                On the right they oppose Libertarian…

                isolationism
                drug laws
                prostitution laws
                military cuts
                patriot act opposition
                war on terror policy
                etc etc

                On the left they oppose Libertarian…

                fiscal policy
                tax policy
                spending policy
                social safety net policy
                etc etc

      • Anonymous

        I believe nothing is more desirable to conservatives than a new President being sworn into office January, 2013. This is why many conservatives understood the flaws of the ABRs and simply could not nominate a candidate that guaranteed a general election defeat.

  • Jason Wright, Editor

    I can’t help but think, does this mean Romney turned out to be “viable” after all? 

    • Gururussell

      Viable?
      Yes.

      Desirable to conservatives?
      No.

      What is that “shaking” noise I’m hearing?

      • Jason Wright, Editor

        “Desirable to conservatives? No.” Pretty broad, don’t you think? Romney won this group in Wisconsin and has been steadily improving. I know a lot of conservatives who have been backing him since day one. 

        • Anonymous

          I have been backing him since day 2. Does that count?

          Wait! I forgot. I am not a “real conservative”.

          • David Kaiser, Editor

            Brian is just harboring a secret hope that Mittens will pick Tim Pawlenty as his running mate to fulfill his political fantasies…

            • Anonymous

              HaHaHa….

              As much as I like T-Paw he would not be my my #2 of choice. Ryan, Jindal, Rubio, etc. etc.

              I do believe the #2 field is quite deep and exciting.

        • Gururussell

          Pretty broad?
          Where??!!
          Just kidding…I’m a married man.

          Don’t know that his steady improvement among conservatives means anything much, other than the slow acceptance of the reality that “it is what it is” this year.

          But, I agree with Whodat…time to join up and fight the real enemy.
          However, we don’t need to pretend that conservatives are suddenly feeling a thrill up the leg.  We’re just gonna have to fake it.

          • Jason Wright, Editor

            Don’t think it means anything much? Hmmm. The alternative could have been that they went for Rick, or stayed home completely. There is at least one PD regular who’s said over and over he would not vote under any circumstances for Romney if he’s the nominee. I think what we’ve seen in recent weeks is that the literal ABR pool, i.e. people who won’t show up in November, is much smaller than advertised.

            But yes, I completely agree that this hardly means he’s bridged the enthusiasm gap. Don’t think he ever will or ever could. But can he win the middle? The group that decides most races?

            • dw

              Sure, Romney can win the middle. He’s Democrat-Lite, which will appeal to moderates. He may even draw in some Democrats, if Obama shifts hard left again.

              And, I’m not talking about social issues. I’m referring to the economy and role of the US government. It was very disappointing to see what Bush did in his last four years. Yes, Obama was even worse. But, I fear that Romney will be more of a spender than Bush, and really won’t fix the problems facing the US economy. What’s the point in that? Let Obama win the White House, but keep him in check with the Congress. Then, let’s get a real fiscal conservative and small government candidate in 2016 who is willing to make the cuts needed and return power to the states.

              I still find it hard to believe that the Libertarian party just can’t get any traction. They have a liberal social stand that should appeal to moderates, and a strong conservative fiscal approach that would appeal to a lot of the GOP. And, the foreign policy approach that would make Democrats smile. Speaking as a very social conservative person, I would (and have) vote Libertarian over GOP without hesitation, if the GOP candidates continue to look like Romney. 

              • Anonymous

                The Libertarian Party will always be a fringer third party because they take positions that both those on the left and right love, but, also positions that both on the left and right cringe in fear of.

                On the right they oppose Libertarian…

                isolationism
                drug laws
                prostitution laws
                military cuts
                patriot act opposition
                war on terror policy
                etc etc

                On the left they oppose Libertarian…

                fiscal policy
                tax policy
                spending policy
                social safety net policy
                etc etc

      • Anonymous

        I believe nothing is more desirable to conservatives than a new President being sworn into office January, 2013. This is why many conservatives understood the flaws of the ABRs and simply could not nominate a candidate that guaranteed a general election defeat.

  • Raul

    What will the ABRbots do now?!?!

  • Raul

    What will the ABRbots do now?!?!

  • https://twitter.com/#!/PD_Scott Scott A. Robinson, Editor

    Santorum’s polling was going the wrong direction in his home state of Pennsylvania. He surely did not want to be embarrassed there in a second straight election.

    • Anonymous

      Now the ABRs can claim all of Santorum’s supporters will go to Newt. lol.

      The Santorum downfall began the day he touted Democrats to go to the polls to vote for him. Since that day it has been a steady decline for team Santorum.

      • Jason Wright, Editor

        The downfall began the day he lost in PA by 17 points, and his home county by 30. People who lose November elections don’t generally make great candidates down the road. It’s one thing to run for a nomination and lose, then run again. It’s another to be fired by the people who know you best by 17 points.

        • Raul

           So how do you really feel, Jason?

          • Jason Wright, Editor

            I’ve always thought he was a decent guy and a lousy candidate. I’ve been pretty fair in my analysis of this race thus far, despite some ABRbots accusing me of being “in the tank” for Romney.

            The fact is that it’s played out how I thought it would.

            • German Observer

              Fair enough, Jason. But do I remember correctly, that you said some time before Iowa, somebody should tell Santorum this election is not about social issues?

              I think, you, I and everybody else underestimated Santorum and the power of his message at this point.

              Anayway, from the viewpoint of an (hypothetical) political adviser to me the crucial question is: what would have been, if the ABR-vote would not have been constantly split? Romney did not have 50% of the vote, except for in Massachussetts, if I remeber that correctly. The ABR-vote in total was constantly in the range of 60-70%. They just have been to dull to bundle it.

              • Gururussell

                G.O. !
                I finally find myself in total agreement with you on a post. 
                (We should both probably be a little frightened by that!)

                Well stated, sir.
                 

              • German Observer

                No Gary, I’m not scared at all.

                Cause, I know all the things I didn’t right for matters of time and language skills – and you wouldn’t have agreed with.

                Don’t forget, apart from, that I have to do my daily business (as all of us), participarting here takes at least double effort to me, as I’m not that articulate and fast in English as I wished I’d be.

              • Gururussell

                I admire your bilingual skills.
                You’ve certainly got me beat.

                (Unless we count “music notation” as the “international language”, in which case I will claim bilingual status.)

              • Anonymous

                Not getting 50% in a field of 4-10 candidates is not unheard of I would imagine.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Are you arguing that this race WAS about social issues? Look at the exit polls, my friend.

                The combining the ABR vote and assuming it all goes to one candidate or another is a false premise. What about the ABS vote? Or the ABN vote? Those camps existed. Not in the same numbers as the vocal ABRbots, of course, but I personally know people in both in my small little world of Woodstock, Va.

              • German Observer

                No Jason, I was not exactly arguing, that this race was about social issues. What I was trying to say is, that those issues in combination with the ABR-desire were at least strong enough to let Santorum have a long, long ride.

                Secondly I agree with you, that the equation would not have beeen that simple in the sense that only one ABR-candidate would have gathered the whole bunch of votes. But I guess you would agree, that with a weak candidate that Romney is, a SINGLE ABR-candidate however weak he might have been (and Santorum, Newt, Paul, Perry all have  tons of baggage) would have changed the game, do you?

              • Anonymous

                I also believe people forget that Rick did not perform during the debate cycle.  He was abysmal!   Although Iowa made him a contender in the national spotlight, his weakness in debating was less exposed once they stopped after Florida.

            • Gururussell

              “it’s played out how I thought it would” ???? 

              Love you, bro, but I don’t recall you saying that Santorum would give Romney a serious run for his money (literally) :)
               

              • Anonymous

                Jason was likely referring to the fact that Romney would eventually secure the election over time from a truly national well organized campaign. The outcome has unfolded in a fair;y traditional way.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Brian is correct, not that I thought it would be Santorum, just that there would be an insurgent horse who made a run. But for all the complaining about money, where do people think organization comes from? Money gets you on ballots, gets you captains in every county, etc. etc. etc. Money was always going to win in the end, and in my mind, that’s a good thing. It’s not the money that wins it, it’s what the money represents. Organization, a machine, a campaign run by grownups.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Gary, that was rhetorical, not a question(s) aimed at you :)

              • Gururussell

                I’ll be obtuse and answer it, anyway :)

                “where do people think organization comes from?”

                Unfortunately, it is often and usually from power brokers whose sole interest is in keeping their power and maintaining the status quo. 

                Wow.  Did I just channel my inner Ron Paul? 

        • Anonymous

          But the true politician is usually blind to what their constituents really want – right?  Even a message like in 2006 gets suppressed into the brain and never becomes part of their new reality.
           

    • Anonymous

      The $2.6 million media buy probably broke the back – there was no winning the media war.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/PD_Scott Scott A. Robinson

    Santorum’s polling was going the wrong direction in his home state of Pennsylvania. He surely did not want to be embarrassed there in a second straight election.

    • Anonymous

      Now the ABRs can claim all of Santorum’s supporters will go to Newt. lol.

      The Santorum downfall began the day he touted Democrats to go to the polls to vote for him. Since that day it has been a steady decline for team Santorum.

      • Jason Wright, Editor

        The downfall began the day he lost in PA by 17 points, and his home county by 30. People who lose November elections don’t generally make great candidates down the road. It’s one thing to run for a nomination and lose, then run again. It’s another to be fired by the people who know you best by 17 points.

        • Raul

           So how do you really feel, Jason?

          • Jason Wright, Editor

            I’ve always thought he was a decent guy and a lousy candidate. I’ve been pretty fair in my analysis of this race thus far, despite some ABRbots accusing me of being “in the tank” for Romney.

            The fact is that it’s played out how I thought it would.

            • German Observer

              Fair enough, Jason. But do I remember correctly, that you said some time before Iowa, somebody should tell Santorum this election is not about social issues?

              I think, you, I and everybody else underestimated Santorum and the power of his message at this point.

              Anayway, from the viewpoint of an (hypothetical) political adviser to me the crucial question is: what would have been, if the ABR-vote would not have been constantly split? Romney did not have 50% of the vote, except for in Massachussetts, if I remeber that correctly. The ABR-vote in total was constantly in the range of 60-70%. They just have been to dull to bundle it.

              • Gururussell

                G.O. !
                I finally find myself in total agreement with you on a post. 
                (We should both probably be a little frightened by that!)

                Well stated, sir.
                 

              • German Observer

                No Gary, I’m not scared at all.

                Cause, I know all the things I didn’t right for matters of time and language skills – and you wouldn’t have agreed with.

                Don’t forget, apart from, that I have to do my daily business (as all of us), participarting here takes at least double effort to me, as I’m not that articulate and fast in English as I wished I’d be.

              • Gururussell

                I admire your bilingual skills.
                You’ve certainly got me beat.

                (Unless we count “music notation” as the “international language”, in which case I will claim bilingual status.)

              • Anonymous

                Not getting 50% in a field of 4-10 candidates is not unheard of I would imagine.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Are you arguing that this race WAS about social issues? Look at the exit polls, my friend.

                The combining the ABR vote and assuming it all goes to one candidate or another is a false premise. What about the ABS vote? Or the ABN vote? Those camps existed. Not in the same numbers as the vocal ABRbots, of course, but I personally know people in both in my small little world of Woodstock, Va.

              • German Observer

                No Jason, I was not exactly arguing, that this race was about social issues. What I was trying to say is, that those issues in combination with the ABR-desire were at least strong enough to let Santorum have a long, long ride.

                Secondly I agree with you, that the equation would not have beeen that simple in the sense that only one ABR-candidate would have gathered the whole bunch of votes. But I guess you would agree, that with a weak candidate that Romney is, a SINGLE ABR-candidate however weak he might have been (and Santorum, Newt, Paul, Perry all have  tons of baggage) would have changed the game, do you?

              • Anonymous

                I also believe people forget that Rick did not perform during the debate cycle.  He was abysmal!   Although Iowa made him a contender in the national spotlight, his weakness in debating was less exposed once they stopped after Florida.

            • Gururussell

              “it’s played out how I thought it would” ???? 

              Love you, bro, but I don’t recall you saying that Santorum would give Romney a serious run for his money (literally) :)
               

              • Anonymous

                Jason was likely referring to the fact that Romney would eventually secure the election over time from a truly national well organized campaign. The outcome has unfolded in a fair;y traditional way.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Brian is correct, not that I thought it would be Santorum, just that there would be an insurgent horse who made a run. But for all the complaining about money, where do people think organization comes from? Money gets you on ballots, gets you captains in every county, etc. etc. etc. Money was always going to win in the end, and in my mind, that’s a good thing. It’s not the money that wins it, it’s what the money represents. Organization, a machine, a campaign run by grownups.

              • Jason Wright, Editor

                Gary, that was rhetorical, not a question(s) aimed at you :)

              • Gururussell

                I’ll be obtuse and answer it, anyway :)

                “where do people think organization comes from?”

                Unfortunately, it is often and usually from power brokers whose sole interest is in keeping their power and maintaining the status quo. 

                Wow.  Did I just channel my inner Ron Paul? 

        • Anonymous

          But the true politician is usually blind to what their constituents really want – right?  Even a message like in 2006 gets suppressed into the brain and never becomes part of their new reality.
           

    • Anonymous

      The $2.6 million media buy probably broke the back – there was no winning the media war.